IWRA Question of the Year 2019 – Is Smart Water Management (SWM) really a smart idea? If so, in what ways? If not, why not? Or, is it smart in some ways and not in others? What could make it smarter (institutions, policy, other)❓

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15
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15
Ignacio
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    Neil Grigg

    Smart water management is a great concept, but it has many facets and must be explained that way. For example, it can make systems more efficient (a good idea), but like other smart technologies, it has implications for privacy (a concern). Also, water systems have many social objectives and the jury is out about whether smart technologies help with those. It is my opinion that smart technologies can help with them, including helping with access and affordability of drinking water.

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    Himanshu Prasad

    Technologically smart water management is a must to rationalise the system vrs. huge expenses of the project so as to ensure last mile connectivity with ease and control the huge UFW. With socially acceptable approach and fibre optics network, it is possible but we like space engineering, have to keep running relentlessly without glitch supported by robust cloud backup.

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    Dr. A. Jothibasu

    Smart Water Management is the good initiative at the present context. The water management education system will start from primary school onward. This system will be reach at the village people, farmers etc., The sustainable groundwater development and climate change related water management should be included in this scheme.

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    Engr. Joberth Gambati

    Smart is the way, and the think of the new era, smart management come to complement that idea, since a watershed real time analysis to a distribution smart system, we can keep up the I/O, the loss, then make better solutions, and manage better, we need technologies less expensive, easily applicable. We not really have a Perfect AI, smart an can analyze and make decisions, but we can facilitate the access to data, and adjust for better management. To make a management smarter we need better policies of preservation and concession for different water resources, with limits and based in studies, correlations, real data, to sustain the argument, to sensitize the different water users and to make simple decisions for many cases.

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    FRADIN

    SWM is of course a good idea (which should improve efficiency and decrease costs) but as it happens for all the good ideas (see IWRM) the issue is a correct implementation.
    Cases studies show that the application of new technologies may lead to a substantial improvement of a better water resource management as well as an increasing access to water and sanitation. However this technologies need a capacity to be correctly used: this capacity relies, on one hand on the ability to carry out an efficient management of data bases (collection, validation, treatment, easy access for the users), on the other hand on the capacity of the human resource to use correctly these advances rooms they get. It means that the implementation of SWM must include a strong part of training and capacity building. It is also important to develop an adapted communication to the people who will be concerned by the implementation of these new technologies in order to set up a socially acceptable system.

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    RAMADAN MARNE

    Smart Water Managament(SWM) is a solution to address water losses in a distribution network. According to Chadian Water Comapny,40% of the total volume of water produced per day is loss through leakages,pipe burst and illegal connection to the network system. This contributes to a great economic loss of the country and decreases the effeciency of water supply to the customers.However, The use of Information and Communication Technology(ICT) can help to improve the water service to the customers. If 40% of the water loss is expressed in terms of cash over a period of 40 years,it is enough to adopt an ICT to monitor the distribution network. For a sustainable water management,SWM is needed in all African cities with pipe born systems as Africa is faced with the issue of climate change,population growth and ever-increased water demand.

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    RAMADAN MARNE

    Smart Water Managament(SWM) is a solution to address water losses in a distribution network. According to Chadian Water Comapny,40% of the total volume of water produced per day is loss through leakages,pipe burst and illegal connection to the network system. This contributes to a great economic loss of the country and decreases the effeciency of water supply to the customers.However, The use of Information and Communication Technology(ICT) can help to improve the water service to the customers. If 40% of the water loss is expressed in terms of cash over a period of 40 years,it is enough to adopt an ICT to monitor the distribution network. For a sustainable water management,SWM is needed in all African cities with pipe born systems as Africa is faced with the issue of climate change,population growth and ever-increased water demand. Strict policy implementation with the support of institutions, a SWM can be made.

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    AMALI, Amali Abraham

    SWM as a concept evolves in response to the rising need for collaborative information sharing and practices in water resources management. Automated responses towards increasing security and efficiency, while decreasing risk and uncertainty may be the addon that SWM brings to IWRM and the discuss on Water Resources Management. IWRM typically relies on principles of common pool resource management with relatively clear data-driven demand forecasts, where all players as user sectors, are given voice and apportioned user rights. But as a concept, IWRM is often criticised for both excess and lack of adherence to scientific principles, questioning its value outside academic discourse and often described as a consensus without practice.

    The assertions that introducing real-time data and automation, will automatically translate to more efficient services, reliable water management, inclusive decision-making, and improved collaborative knowledge sharing still banks on the idealism that befell IWRM as a concept. How can SWM facilitate access to data especially in transboundary basins? How will AI-driven automated systems to bypass the need for self-sufficiency in water security to ensure equitable distribution with zero conflicting political interests? In addition to IWRM being regarded as ambitious in its objectives, idealistic in its agenda, and only used to secure funding, it is thought to have by now achieved measurable impacts the absence of which degrades it to a “hollow concept without merit.” It is therefore easily envisaged that as SWM inclines more towards socio-ecological consideration and institutional reforms in the planning and implementation process, it will likely open avenues for similar criticisms that waylaid IWRM and may die before its birth in the absence of which it will be fast labelled as biased.

    The mention of water in IWRM drives a perception that it is single-faceted and non-holistic as it will be illogical to integrate a single resource. Despite an origin focused on a water-society interface, IWRM has struggled to evolve into a balanced account of human-environment relations and to include consideration of the entire ecosystem. This is what SWM as a concept must watch for as it carefully creates a niche within the confines of IWRM by first capitalising on its deficiencies to provide proven, tangible and trackable progress before being embedded within. Summarily, SWRM can be smart in her own way by first evolving as an independent provable concept that capitalises on real-time data and the need for automation in the water sector before being embedded within other existing concepts.

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    DR. ABRAHAM CARDENAS TRISTAN

    The intelligent management of water management is a principle that has not had enough forms and strategies that must be adequately transmitted in societies. First, because those who educate at primary and secondary levels lack the capacity of knowledge to transmit on this important principle.
    Second, that in societies, those who administer and govern the water resource have not sufficiently conceived the ideology of the sustainability of water resource management.

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    JIA Shaofeng

    Smart water management will certainly be the future of water management, although now it's not feasible everywhere because of its high cost.

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    Rashail İsmayilov

    In water management water organizations are facing growing challenges, including aging infrastructure, rising energy costs and growing populations. Smart water management helps solve these challenges through self-optimizing equipment and analytics that support proactive decisions. Smart Water Management (SWM) improve efficiency and reduce costs in water management. However, as populations start to grow, so does overall consumption, which increases the amount of water usage across the world. Smart Water Management (SWM) water management allows organizations to better manage public services.

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    Peter Addo Amarkai

    Population growth, modernization, and all other areas of development require that available resources are used efficiently. Being able to control and track water usage using technology is a good idea despite the fact it can not be applicable in most rural communities. It is obvious that in developed countries a lot of successes will be recorded with Smart water Management, unlike most developing countries. This concept, in the future, must meet global needs, and this can happen when it is understandable, cost-effective, easy-to-use, and sustainable.

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    M. P. Trudeau

    SWM means different things in different contexts since it is not a precisely defined term. If it is broadly defined to mean the application of technologies to manage water resources then, like any tool, SWM works best where a long-term vision and purpose have been laid out in advance of investments in the tools themselves. With changes now occurring in the water cycle due to climate change, water management challenges extend beyond the traditional objectives of improving efficiencies to re-thinking water use and infrastructure design, as well as recognizing the co-dependence, with humans, of ecosystems on sufficient water supplies to sustain themselves. These challenges require on-going adaptive approaches and SWM can assist with numerous implementation and monitoring functions but it will not answer the core questions about priorities and values.

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    Hamza Ozguler

    I think that the concept of Smart Water Management (SWM) is a good idea, but not a “smart” one! In fact, utilising the up-to-date technologies, water management should always smart. In the other words, water management should always be equipped with smart techniques and constantly renewed. Therefore, there is no need for us to name it with an extra concept, “smart”. Actually, this expression implies some commercial expectations. So, I think that water management should not be intentionally used for commercial (wars) purposes.

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